MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | Beaten up before questioning ‘because they wanted to introduce themselves’

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | Beaten up before questioning ‘because they wanted to introduce themselves’

Source: InterAksyon.com

As we commemorate the 40th anniversary of the declaration of Martial Law on September 21, 1972, InterAksyon.com posts a series of testimonies from human rights victims of the Marcos regime. Thousands of Filipinos were murdered, tortured, or disappeared in the 14 years the country was under a dictatorship.

After the fall of the Marcos regime in 1986, close to 10,000 human rights victims – the survivors themselves or their families – filed a class suit against the Marcos estate. A US district court in Hawaii ruled in January 1995 that the victims are entitled to a share of the ill-gotten wealth recovered from the Marcoses: a total of $2.7 billion for their torment and torture.   

However, the legal victory remains only on paper. The Hawaii ruling has to be enforced in the Philippines by a local court. The Makati Regional Trial Court is currently hearing the case but the Marcoses have so far been successful in blocking compensation to the plaintiffs.

So far, only $10 million, or $1,000 each, has been awarded to the victims and their kin. The money is not even part of the $2.7-billion compensatory and exemplary damages awarded by the Hawaii court but is from a settlement with Marcos crony, Jose Yao Campos, who has real estate properties in Texas and Colorado.

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | Beaten up before questioning 'because they wanted to introduce themselves' 1
This is the narrative of a farmer from Hinunangan, Southern Leyte who was arrested by military intelligence in Tacloban City on February 6, 1986, tortured for a month in a safe house, then detained until his release in April under the amnesty program of then President Corazon Aquino. Even before his interrogation began, he said his captors started beating him up because “they wanted to know me first because I was a new detainee.”

This is the English translation of his affidavit, which was written in Bisaya:

On February 6, they arrested me and forced me into a jeep. When I tried to resist, they beat me up. Then they tied me up and then forcibly loaded me onto their vehicle and took me to their safe house.

Even before they started questioning me, they beat me up because, they said, they wanted to introduce themselves to me because I was a new detainee.

They also threatened to place me in solitary confinement and apply electric shock. I was handcuffed for a month.

After a month at the safe house of MIG 8 in Barrio Marasbaras, Tacloban, Leyte I was taken to Camp Lucban in Catbalogan, Samar where I was again interrogated and, because they were not satisfied with my answers, they hung me up for half a day.

Besides the pain I felt all over my body, I also suffered hunger. After this, they jailed me and after two weeks, the OIC Mayor Aquilino Catalan of Catbalogan, Samar visited me but the military warned me not to tell him of what I suffered at their hands and I obeyed out of fear.

Soon after, I was released through the amnesty granted by President Corazon Aquino.

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | ‘They extinguished the butts on my face, lips, body’

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | ‘They extinguished the butts on my face, lips, body’

Source: InterAksyon.com

As we commemorate the 40th anniversary of the declaration of Martial Law on September 21, 1972, InterAksyon.com posts a series of testimonies from human rights victims of the Marcos regime. Thousands of Filipinos were murdered, tortured, or disappeared in the 14 years the country was under a dictatorship.

After the fall of the Marcos regime in 1986, close to 10,000 human rights victims – the survivors themselves or their families – filed a class suit against the Marcos estate. A US district court in Hawaii ruled in January 1995 that the victims are entitled to a share of the ill-gotten wealth recovered from the Marcoses: a total of $2.7 billion for their torment and torture.   

However, the legal victory remains only on paper. The Hawaii ruling has to be enforced in the Philippines by a local court. The Makati Regional Trial Court is currently hearing the case but the Marcoses have so far been successful in blocking compensation to the plaintiffs.

So far, only $10 million, or $1,000 each, has been awarded to the victims and their kin. The money is not even part of the $2.7-billion compensatory and exemplary damages awarded by the Hawaii court but is from a settlement with Marcos crony, Jose Yao Campos, who has real estate properties in Texas and Colorado.

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | 'They extinguished the butts on my face, lips, body' 2

This is the narrative from the affidavit of Erico O. Bucoy, a 21-year-old-employee, who was arrested in 1972 by the police and a paramilitary unit in San Fernando, Bukidnon. He was tortured and detained for three years.

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | At 12, he watched his parents die and was made a slave to soldiers

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | At 12, he watched his parents die and was made a slave to soldiers

Source: InterAksyon.com

As we commemorate the 40th anniversary of the declaration of Martial Law on September 21, 1972, InterAksyon.com posts a series of testimonies from human rights victims of the Marcos regime. Thousands of Filipinos were murdered, tortured, or disappeared in the 14 years the country was under a dictatorship.

After the fall of the Marcos regime in 1986, close to 10,000 human rights victims – the survivors themselves or their families – filed a class suit against the Marcos estate. A US district court in Hawaii ruled in January 1995 that the victims are entitled to a share of the ill-gotten wealth recovered from the Marcoses: a total of $2.7 billion for their torment and torture.   

However, the legal victory remains only on paper. The Hawaii ruling has to be enforced in the Philippines by a local court. The Makati Regional Trial Court is currently hearing the case but the Marcoses have so far been successful in blocking compensation to the plaintiffs.

So far, only $10 million, or $1,000 each, has been awarded to the victims and their kin. The money is not even part of the $2.7-billion compensatory and exemplary damages awarded by the Hawaii court but is from a settlement with Marcos crony, Jose Yao Campos, who has real estate properties in Texas and Colorado.

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | At 12, he watched his parents die and was made a slave to soldiers 3

This narrative is from the affidavit of a resident of Veruela, Agusan del Sur who, in October 1981, when he was 12, watched as militia murdered his parents and escaped being killed himself. When he reported the killings to the detachment of Airborne troops in his village, he was instead turned into an errand boy. When he finally found access to a lawyer, he asked if there was a chance he could get justice for his parents. The reply: ‘Unlikely because the military did it and we are still under Martial Law.’

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | Orphaned son to rebel-parents: ‘Sorry, I thought you were selfish’

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | Orphaned son to rebel-parents: ‘Sorry, I thought you were selfish’

Source: InterAksyon.com

As we commemorate the 40th anniversary of the declaration of Martial Law on September 21, 1972, InterAksyon.com posts a series of testimonies from human rights victims of the Marcos regime. Thousands of Filipinos were murdered, tortured, or disappeared in the country’s decade under military rule.

But aside from those who directly suffered the regime’s atrocities, there were the other victims — their families. The widows and widowers, the orphans, those who saw loved ones savaged or slaughtered before their very eyes, or taken away never to be heard from or seen again. And there were the children born and/or raised behind bars by parents jailed for opposing tyranny, and those who grew up with surrogates as their fathers and mothers acted on their convictions by taking to the countryside to wage actual combat against the forces of dictatorship.

 

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | Orphaned son to rebel-parents: 'Sorry, I thought you were selfish' 4Since he was a child, call center senior executive-turned-human rights activist Ron de Vera, 31, of Amnesty International, found it hard to fit into the “normal” world.  He would often lie about the identities and whereabouts of his parents.

“I told different stories about them — they were abroad, had separated, or already dead.”

De Vera’s parents went underground during Martial Law. His mother, Adora Faye, was arrested by the military in 1976. She was stripped, beaten, and repeatedly raped during tactical interrogations. Adora got pregnant after the repeated sexual assaults and was forced to induce an abortion. De Vera’s father, Manuel, disappeared 22 years ago and has remained missing to this day.

This is the story of the orphaned child and his path to awakening.

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | Tortured in 1974 and 1994: ‘The military hasn’t changed its style’

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | Tortured in 1974 and 1994: ‘The military hasn’t changed its style’

Source: InterAksyon.com

As we commemorate the 40th anniversary of the declaration of Martial Law on September 21, 1972, InterAksyon.com posts a series of testimonies from human rights victims of the Marcos regime. Thousands of Filipinos were murdered, tortured, or disappeared in the 14 years the country was under a dictatorship. 

After the fall of the Marcos regime in 1986, close to 10,000 human rights victims – the survivors themselves or their families – filed a class suit against the Marcos estate. A US district court in Hawaii ruled in January 1995 that the victims are entitled to a share of the ill-gotten wealth recovered from the Marcoses: a total of $2.7 billion for their torment and torture.   

However, the legal victory remains only on paper. The Hawaii ruling has to be enforced in the Philippines by a local court. The Makati Regional Trial Court is currently hearing the case but the Marcoses have so far been successful in blocking compensation to the plaintiffs.

So far, only $10 million, or $1,000 each, has been awarded to the victims and their kin. The money is not even part of the $2.7-billion compensatory and exemplary damages awarded by the Hawaii court but is from a settlement with Marcos crony, Jose Yao Campos, who has real estate properties in Texas and Colorado.

 

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | Tortured in 1974 and 1994: 'The military hasn't changed its style' 5Talk about deja vu experience and multi-awarded writer Bonifacio Ilagan, chairman of the First Quarter Storm Movement, would have a ready example.

Arrested and detained in 1974 while the head of the Marcos regime’s Philippine Constabulary was Gen. Fidel V. Ramos, the then chairman of Kabataang Makabayan in U.P, was again arrested in 1994 when FVR was already the president.

In both instances, Ilagan, now 61, was tortured my military men, who did not identify themselves.

“Marcos…Ramos, the styles of the miitary are just the same. It was better when I was arrested in 1974 because they brought me straight to Camp Crame. But in 1994, I was brought to a motel in Baguio after my arrest in Benguet. I thought that it was already my time to die because they did not record my arrest,” says Ilagan, also vice chairman of Selda or the Samahan ng Ex-Detainees Laban sa Detensyon at Aresto.

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | ‘Unbearable torture pushed my brother to try to drown himself’

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | ‘Unbearable torture pushed my brother to try to drown himself’

Source: InterAksyon.com

As we commemorate the 40th anniversary of the declaration of Martial Law on September 21, 1972, InterAksyon.com posts a series of testimonies from human rights victims of the Marcos regime. Thousands of Filipinos were murdered, tortured, or disappeared in the 14 years the country was under a dictatorship.

After the fall of the Marcos regime in 1986, close to 10,000 human rights victims – the survivors themselves or their families – filed a class suit against the Marcos estate. A US district court in Hawaii ruled in January 1995 that the victims are entitled to a share of the ill-gotten wealth recovered from the Marcoses: a total of $2.7 billion for their torment and torture.   

However, the legal victory remains only on paper. The Hawaii ruling has to be enforced in the Philippines by a local court. The Makati Regional Trial Court is currently hearing the case but the Marcoses have so far been successful in blocking compensation to the plaintiffs.

So far, only $10 million, or $1,000 each, has been awarded to the victims and their kin. The money is not even part of the $2.7-billion compensatory and exemplary damages awarded by the Hawaii court but is from a settlement with Marcos crony, Jose Yao Campos, who has real estate properties in Texas and Colorado

MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | 'Unbearable torture pushed my brother to try to drown himself' 6Now 60 years old and doing business at a market in Manila, Francisco “Kiko” Luneta of Batangas City can still vividly recall how he and his six siblings – Maxima, Romeo, Jose, Domingo, Franco, and Ernesto – were tortured by the military starting in 1974.

Their youngest brother, Ernesto, suffered the most, according to Francisco. After his torturers threw him in a pool, Ernesto tried to commit suicide by gulping water and drowning himself.

“Ayaw na n’yang umahon. Gusto na niyang mamatay kasi di n’ya na kaya ang torture [He didn’t want to get out of the pool anymore. He wanted to die because he could no longer endure the torture],” says Francisco, who began having a hearing problem after his tormentors repeatedly knocked his ears and head until his eardrums broke.